A Study of Technology Transfer from Taiwan’s Academia to Private Industry and the Science and Technology Basic Act

A Study of Technology Transfer from Taiwan’s Academia to Private Industry and the Science and Technology Basic Act

 

Title
A Study of Technology Transfer from Taiwan’s Academia to Private Industry and the Science and Technology Basic Act
Author
Wei-Lin Wang
Keywords
Bayh-Dole Act, Science and Technology Basic Act, technology transfer, cooperation between academia and private industry, conflicts of interest
Abstract
In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Bayh-Dole Act, which made a
huge policy change in federal-sponsored research with regard to patent
rights. The Act was designed to promote technology transfer by allowing
universities and other academic institutes to retain titles to patents resulting
from federally funded research. Prior to this Act, patent rights were retained
by the federal agencies themselves. After the passage of this Act, universities
are allowed to receive royalties from licensing patent rights to private
sectors for further development and commercialization.
It is believed that this Act generates valuable effects in terms of
promoting commercial development of research results. Therefore, Taiwan
also passed the Science and Technology Basic Act in January 2001, which
adopts all fundamental principles of the Bayh-Dole Act.
It is already more than 8 years since the passage of the Science and
Technology Basic Act, and thus it is time to review its policy and determine
whether it serves its legislative purposes. This article analyzes concrete data and
concludes that the Science and Technology Basic Act does generate certain positive effects compared with other countries mimicking the Bayh-Dole Act, while also
presents major proposed modification to deal with the shortage of this Act.
Abstract Article

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